6 global breakfasts you have to try on your next trip

Breakfast is often called the most important meal of the day and each country has its own way of making it special.

From spicy tortillas to eggs with all the trimmings, here are some of our favourite breakfast traditions from around the world:

BREAKFAST IN AUSTRALIA

Breakfast in Australia, and especially in the beachside city of Sydney, is all about freshness. Eggs are usually poached and come with a range of colourful vegetables, from rosy red tomatoes to crisp salad green, perfectly browned garlic-tinged mushrooms to lightly grilled asparagus. The most popular breakfast dish down under is undoubtedly avocado on toast, which is made simply in homes around the country where it is finished with a sprinkle of salt and freshly cracked pepper for a quick morning bite. But it really becomes something special when given the gourmet treatment in cafes, where toppings include lime juice and chilli, or pomegranate and goats cheese, or crispy shards of bacon. All crowned with a ubiquitous poached egg, of course.

Where to try it:

One of the best places to try avocado on toast is The Boathouse at Balmoral Beach where this breakfast favourite is crowned with fresh tomato, feta and basil. Coupled with a creamy flat white coffee and a view of the sparkling ocean, it’s the perfect start to the day.

A classic Jamaican breakfast is likely to be unlike any you've tried before. (Image: Alex Lalak)

BREAKFAST IN JAMAICA

The Jamaicans take breakfast seriously, and the first meal of the day here is probably unlike any you’ve seen before. Forget the pastries or egg-based dishes that reign supreme throughout the rest of the world. In Jamaica, breakfast centres around saltfish (usually cod) fritters served with a golden-fleshed fruit known as ackee, a kale-like green leafed vegetable called callaloo, fried plantains and chewy fried dumplings. It’s an unusual combination of flavours, but one that is highly revered by Jamaicans and surprisingly delicious, even to the uninitiated palate. Wash it all down with some strong coffee and you’re set for a full day of adventure.

Where to try it:

Breakfast in Jamaica is usually enjoyed at home, so it’s best to try it out somewhere with a relaxed environment, such as Sonia's Homestyle Cooking and Natural Juices. This Kingston favourite is proudly unpretentious and does traditional dishes with a loving flair.

BREAKFAST IN TURKEY

A traditional Turkish breakfast, known as ‘kahvalti’, is excellent for fussy eaters because it’s all about variety. A plethora of little plates cover the table, each containing a different tasty delight, and you are invited to pick and choose what you would like to try. Think cheese and olives, sliced tomatoes and cucumbers, eggs either boiled or made into a fluffy omelette called menemen, crisp filo pastries, salami or slices of cured beef, plus a wide range of condiments from honey to jam, chili sauce to sweet butter. Tea is a popular accompaniment, although for the real experience go for an inky cup of traditional Turkish coffee.

Where to try it:

Take your kahvalti with a stunning view of the Bosphorus river at Mangerie Bebek, which is perched on the third floor of a building in the upmarket Bebek neighbourhood and is a popular place among both travellers and locals for a long breakfast.

BREAKFAST IN MALAYSIA

In Malaysia, they like to start the day in a patriotic way by eating the national dish Nasi Lemak. At the centre is fragrant rice cooked with coconut milk and pandan leaf, and this is a surrounded by a ring of flavours including boiled egg, sambal, ikan bilis (anchovies) and peanuts. This dish is also popular in neighbouring countries, particularly Singapore and southern Thailand, and can also be enjoyed at other times of the day usually accompanied by fried chicken or a spoonful of beef rendang curry and cooling slices of cucumber.

Where to try it:

Nasi Lemak is best eaten from a traditional hawker stall – and finding your favourite one is all part of the fun. If you want to take things up a notch, try the version at Nasi Lemak Tanglin, hidden in the middle of the city centre in Kuala Lumpur.

Breakfast at The Wolseley is a grand affair - and something you have to try at least once. (Image: Supplied)

BREAKFAST IN ENGLAND

Breakfast in England is a hearty, and almost heart-stopping, affair. The classic choice is the Full English Breakfast, a plentiful plate of food that centres around fried eggs and bacon and usually also includes sausages, baked beans, black pudding, fried tomatoes and mushrooms with toast and endless cups of tea on the side. This filling combination needs to be approached with a substantial appetite, but it’s a popular way to welcome a new day, and enjoyed throughout the country in homes, diner-style cafes (known as “caffs”) and restaurants. For something different, try the dish that originated in colonial India and was a popular breakfast dish in Victorian times called kedgeree, which is a mix of rice, smoked haddock and curry powder topped with boiled egg.

Where to try it:

Head to The Wolseley in London to enjoy your Full English Breakfast alongside the rich and famous. This chic eatery, popular with media types, does a superb version that comes with the option of fried, poached or scrambled eggs. It’s also one of the best places in London to try kedgeree.

BREAKFAST IN MEXICO

It shouldn’t be a surprise that Mexicans like to begin each day with a spicy kick, and that’s certainly what you get when you eat chilaquiles. Quartered and fried tortillas are laid down as a base then topped with punchy red or green salsa. This is all simmered together until the tortilla triangles start to soften before it is all topped with a fragrant scattering of thickened cream, grated cheese, onion rings and avocado slices and served with more chili sauce on the side.

Where to try it:

You can’t go past the cleverly named Chilakillers, where this Mexican breakfast classic is their passion. You can mix and match your chilaquiles here and add anything you like, from fried eggs to spicy chorizo sausage, all topped, of course, with plenty of house-made salsa.